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Struwwelpeter: Humor or Horror? 160 Years Later by Barbara Smith Chalou

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Published by Lexington Books .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Poetry & poets: 19th century,
  • Poetry,
  • General,
  • Literary Criticism,
  • Literature - Classics / Criticism,
  • German,
  • Struwwelpeter,
  • Children"s Literature - General,
  • Regional, Ethnic, Genre, Specific Subject,
  • Literary Criticism & Collections / General,
  • Continental European,
  • 1809-1894.,
  • Hoffmann, Heinrich,

Book details:

The Physical Object
FormatPaperback
Number of Pages100
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL7913792M
ISBN 100739116649
ISBN 109780739116647

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  Struwwelpeter: Humor or Horror? is a critical analysis of the now infamous Struwwelpeter stories. While Hoffman intended his depictions of amputated limbs and burning children to be humorous and to warn children against misbehavior, some find the punishments can be excessively : Barbara Smith Chalou. Struwwelpeter: Humor or Horror? is a critical analysis of the now infamous Struwwelpeter stories. While Hoffman intended his depictions of amputated limbs and burning children to be humorous and to Reviews: 1. The book came about due to the publishers desire to print artist Sarita Vendetta’s modern day horror interpretations of Hoffman’s verses. Vendetta’s illustrations are brilliantly executed and successfully disturbing, but they lack the quaint humor and subtlety of the simple rhythms that permeate Hoffman’s verse. Der Struwwelpeter is one of those picture books I grew up with, and read and heard repeatedly as a child, so I have an unreasonable amount of love for it, even though it's kind of awful? All credit goes to my German-speaking mom, although I'm not sure if she shared this book with my siblings and me because she thought it was a funny book or was trying to scare us straight/5.

  In the original edition of Heinrich Hoffman’s German children’s book, the most famous character—Struwwelpeter, or “Shockheaded Peter,” whose name later became the book.   The dark humor inherent in Der Struwwelpeter is also credited with directly influencing the work of beloved children's authors including Roald Dahl, Lemony Snicket and Maurice Sendak—who once called Der Struwwelpeter "one of the most beautiful books . See "Struwwelpeter, humor or horror?: years later" by Barbara Smith Chalou. Each story here also has a clear moral that demonstrates the consequences of misbehavior in an exaggerated way and, again like the original, the stories are written in verse.   House of Leaves, by Mark Z. Danielewski Put simply, House of Leaves is one of the most frightening books ever written. From a fairly standard horror premise (a house is revealed to be slightly larger on the inside than is strictly possible) Danielewski spins out a dizzying tale involving multiple unreliable narrators, typographic mysteries, and looping Author: Jeff Somers.

  Struwwelpeter: Humor or Horror? is a critical analysis of the now infamous Struwwelpeter stories. While Hoffman intended his depictions of amputated limbs and burning children to be humorous and to warn children against misbehavior, some find the punishments can be excessively : Lexington Books. Struwwelpeter: Humor or Horror? is a critical analysis of the now infamous Struwwelpeter stories. While Hoffman intended his depictions of amputated limbs and burning children to be humorous and to warn children against misbehavior, some find the punishments can be excessively : Lexington Books. Struwwelpeter: Humor or Horror? Years Later. Plymouth: Lexington Books, pp. $ (cloth), ISBN Reviewed by Benita Blessing (Department of History, Ohio University) Published on H-German (March, ). The original scary book for children, Struwwelpeter was one of the first books written explicitly for kids -- and it didn't exactly coddle them. The book consists of cautionary tales for children, who are warned that if they suck their thumbs, a "great tall tailor" will chop said thumbs off with giant scissors. : Claire Fallon.