Variability in rangeland water erosion processes
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Variability in rangeland water erosion processes proceedings of a symposium sponsored by Divisions S-1, S-6, and S-7 of the Soil Science Society of America in Minneapolis, Minnesota, 1-6 November 1992 by

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Published by Soil Science Society of America in Madison, Wis., USA .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • United States

Subjects:

  • Soil erosion prediction -- Congresses.,
  • Rangelands -- Congresses.,
  • Soil erosion -- Research -- United States -- Congresses.,
  • Rangelands -- Research -- United States -- Congresses.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Other titlesRangeland water erosion processes.
Statementeditors, Wilbert H. Blackburn ... [et al.] ; organizing committee, Wilbert H. Blackburn, Gerald E. Schuman, Frederick B. Pierson.
SeriesSSSA special publication ;, no. 38
ContributionsBlackburn, W. H., Soil Science Society of America. Division S-1., Soil Science Society of America. Division S-6., Soil Science Society of America. Division S-7.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsS622.2 .V37 1994
The Physical Object
Paginationxvii, 106 p. :
Number of Pages106
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL1101412M
ISBN 100891188126
LC Control Number94026299

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Get this from a library! Variability in rangeland water erosion processes: proceedings of a symposium sponsored by Divisions S-1, S-6, and S-7 of the Soil Science Society of America in Minneapolis, Minnesota, November [W H Blackburn; Soil Science Society of America. Division S; Soil Science Society of America. Division S; Soil Science Society of America. Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality— Water Erosion USDA, Natural Resources Conservation Service May Rangeland Sheet 9 What is water erosion? Water erosion is the detachment and removal of soil material by water. The process may be natural or accelerated by human activity. The rate of erosion may be very slow to very rapid,File Size: 1MB. of rangeland processes and indicate that accelerating global change will further T ext Box Chronology of Major Range Management Definitions “The science and art of planning and directing Author: David D. Briske. because existing erosion models were developed from croplands where the hydrologic and erosion processes are different, largely due to much higher levels of heterogeneity in soil and plant properties at the plot scale and the consolidated nature of the soils. The Rangeland Hydrology and Erosion Model (RHEM) was designed to fill that need.

Wind erosion is a major contributing factor to rangeland soil degradation. The process is highly sensitive to variability in soils, weather, and climate, which influence wind erosivity, protective vegetation cover levels, and soil susceptibility to entrainment and transport downwind (see Box 1 for definitions of terms). Wind erosion is also highly sensitive to patterns of land use and land Cited by: major impacts on runoff and soil erosion processes on rangeland ecosystems. These processes and activities affect ecosystem function over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales (Williams et al., b). Nearing et al. () suggested that climatic variability will increase erosion in Cited by: 5. The processes involved in frozen soil erosion are somewhat different from those in normal, unfrozen soil erosion. When the soil solution freezes, some portion of the total water content remains as liquid water. This is critical because the amount of ice formed largely determines the impact of soil freezing on the soil properties that affect. In , the USDA‐Agricultural Research Service (USDA‐ARS) developed the Rangeland Hydrology and Erosion Model (RHEM) V, which used physical‐based concepts from the state‐of‐the‐art technology from the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) (Flanagan & Nearing, ). However, the basic equations in the WEPP model are based on Cited by: 5.

  Wind and Water Erosion. Erosion research on rangelands has traditionally focused on water erosion and associated fluvial processes. One key advance in recent decades is recognition of the importance of wind-driven transport (aeolian) and its linkage with water erosion (Breshears et al. ; Belnap et al. ).Cited by: in New Mexico: Range, Riparian, Erosion, Water Quality and Wildlife, Report Range Improvement Task Force, Agricultural Experiment Station, Cooperative Extension Service, New Mexico State University, College of Agriculture and Home Economics. Las Cruces, NM. Anderson, E. W. Indicators of soil movement on range watersheds. Abstract. Erosion modeling is currently of limited use in combating rangeland desertification. Empirical (e.g., RUSLE) and mechanistic (e.g., WEPP) erosion models exist, but are primarily designed for cropland systems and are difficult to adapt for use on by: 6. conditions (Webb and Strong ). For water erosion, there is a need for models that can represent splash and thin-sheet flow processes that dominate sediment trans-port at the plot and hillslope scales in some rangelands (Nearing et al. ). Data on the nature of management impacts on soil erosion in rangelands are becoming increasingly avail-.